Addenda & FAQ 

2020 Criteria Addenda & FAQ will be posted here as these are developed.

Addendum
Date Posted:
May 29, 2020

In light of the Covid-19 pandemic, in which virtual connectivity, remote schooling, access to tele-medicine and other critical web-based resources is essential, we are expanding the availability of this optional criterion. All projects, regardless of location or construction type, may now choose to pursue Criterion 2.15b for six optional points.

Addendum
Date Posted:
December 1, 2020

This addendum applies to the Compartmentalization requirement for Moderate Rehab properties.  For each dwelling unit in these properties, projects may choose to either meet the .40 CFM50/sfbe compartmentalization target or a 20% improvement of CFM50/sfbe compared to pre-retrofit condition.  For projects with more than one dwelling unit, a combination of these targets may be used at the project team’s discretion (some dwelling units complying with the .40 CFM50/sfbe target and others complying with 20% improvement target).

Addendum
Date Posted:
May 29, 2020

Substantial or Moderate Rehab properties in Colorado in Climate Zone 5 may choose to use an alternate path instead of mandatory 2020 Criterion 5.1b.  This existing building Colorado alternate energy path is administered by Energy Outreach Colorado ; please refer to the linked requirements. 

To demonstrate compliance with this alternate path for Enterprise Green Communities Certification, at Prebuild project teams will upload a confirmation letter to the Enterprise certification portal from EOC showing that the project has appropriately committed to the Colorado alternate path.  At Postbuild, project teams will upload a confirmation letter to the Enterprise certification portal from EOC confirming that the project successfully complied.

Addendum
Date Posted:
April 25, 2022

Properties in the District of Columbia with at least 6 stories may use an alternative pathway to achieving certification with Criterion 5.2b.  This alternative pathway is temporary, and will be retired for use with new Prebuild applications after DOE’s ZERH program allows for the certification of multifamily properties of all heights.  Until then, review and refer to the details of this temporary pathway to guide your project.

FAQ
Date Posted:
December 16, 2021

Q: The Department of Energy ZERH PV Ready Checklist was designed for the needs of single family homes – should properties that are not single family still use it?

A: Properties for whom the single-family based ZERH checklist is not appropriate should still use the checklist as a guide, and, demonstrate adequate infrastructure is installed to accommodate a PV system to be installed in the future that will, at minimum, be sized to serve at least 60% of common area (house meter loads) or at least 10% of the full building load.

Please still use the ZERH PV Ready Checklist as the form of documentation, but, use these adjustments:

  1. Include the first five items of the PV Checklist 

  2. The last four items of the PV Checklist have specific component guidelines which may not be appropriate for large buildings.  Please follow the guidance regarding the general component, but ensure that that component is adequately sized, located, and/or installed in a way to accommodate the size of the system needed for the property.  

    1. For instance, ensure that conduit is run from the array location to the inverter location and inverter location to electrical service location, but, the size of the conduit may be different than 1” (as currently included on the checklist) to accommodate the system needed at the site.  

    2. A 4’x4’ plywood panel area for mounting system components may not be appropriate for the size of the system needed at the site; install blocking or a panel of a size needed to accommodate the site’s expected system.

    3. A 70-amp dual pole circuit breaker may not be an appropriate size for the site’s PV system; ensure adequate service is available to accommodate the site’s expected system.

FAQ
Date Posted:
September 11, 2020

Q: If a project includes electric equipment (of the types listed in the criterion) already, is it eligible for points for Criterion 5.5a?  

A: Only equipment loads powered by a combustion source are eligible for optional points for designing and wiring a seamless switch to electricity as a fuel source.  

FAQ
Date Posted:
December 16, 2021

Q: In the certification portal, how should a project indicate which Promoting Health Through Design Criterion, 7.11, 7.12, or 7.13, is being pursued to fulfill the mandatory requirement?

A: On the Criteria Compliance tab under the Promoting Health Through Design Criterion, 7.11, 7.12, or 7.13, select the check box under “Set as Mandatory” for the intended criterion. This action will revert the criterion to mandatory with zero optional points associated; enabling the remaining two criteria (of 7.11, 7.12, or 7.13) to each be pursued for eight optional points.

FAQ
Date Posted:
September 11, 2020

7.11, 7.12, 7.13 : Promoting Health Through Design   

Q: If a project goes above the mandatory requirement to comply with one of Criteria 7.11, 7.12 & 7.13, and complies with two of the three criteria, would the project earn eight points total or eight points for each criterion? 

A: All projects must comply with at least one of either Criterion 7.11, 7.12, or 7.13. No points are available for meeting this mandatory requirement. If a project complies with a criterion 7.11, 7.12 and 7.13 in addition to meeting the mandatory requirement, it will earn eight points for each additional criterion. 

I.e. A project that complies with Criterion 7.11 earns zero points and meets the mandatory requirement for Promoting Health Through Design. A project that complies with Criterion 7.11 AND 7.12 meets the mandatory requirement for Promoting Health Through Design and earns eight points. And a project that complies with 7.11, 7.12 AND 7.13 meets the mandatory requirement for Promoting Health Through Design and earn sixteen points. 

FAQ
Date Posted:
December 16, 2021

Q: In the certification portal, how should a project indicate which Promoting Health Through Design Criterion, 7.11, 7.12, or 7.13, is being pursued to fulfill the mandatory requirement?

A: On the Criteria Compliance tab under the Promoting Health Through Design Criterion, 7.11, 7.12, or 7.13, select the check box under “Set as Mandatory” for the intended criterion. This action will revert the criterion to mandatory with zero optional points associated; enabling the remaining two criteria (of 7.11, 7.12, or 7.13) to each be pursued for eight optional points.

FAQ
Date Posted:
September 11, 2020

7.11, 7.12, 7.13 : Promoting Health Through Design   

Q: If a project goes above the mandatory requirement to comply with one of Criteria 7.11, 7.12 & 7.13, and complies with two of the three criteria, would the project earn eight points total or eight points for each criterion? 

A: All projects must comply with at least one of either Criterion 7.11, 7.12, or 7.13. No points are available for meeting this mandatory requirement. If a project complies with a criterion 7.11, 7.12 and 7.13 in addition to meeting the mandatory requirement, it will earn eight points for each additional criterion. 

I.e. A project that complies with Criterion 7.11 earns zero points and meets the mandatory requirement for Promoting Health Through Design. A project that complies with Criterion 7.11 AND 7.12 meets the mandatory requirement for Promoting Health Through Design and earns eight points. And a project that complies with 7.11, 7.12 AND 7.13 meets the mandatory requirement for Promoting Health Through Design and earn sixteen points. 

FAQ
Date Posted:
December 17, 2021

Q: In the certification portal, how should a project indicate which Promoting Health Through Design Criterion, 7.11, 7.12, or 7.13, is being pursued to fulfill the mandatory requirement?

A: On the Criteria Compliance tab under the Promoting Health Through Design Criterion, 7.11, 7.12, or 7.13, select the check box under “Set as Mandatory” for the intended criterion. This action will revert the criterion to mandatory with zero optional points associated; enabling the remaining two criteria (of 7.11, 7.12, or 7.13) to each be pursued for eight optional points.

FAQ
Date Posted:
September 11, 2020

7.11, 7.12, 7.13 : Promoting Health Through Design   

Q: If a project goes above the mandatory requirement to comply with one of Criteria 7.11, 7.12 & 7.13, and complies with two of the three criteria, would the project earn eight points total or eight points for each criterion? 

A: All projects must comply with at least one of either Criterion 7.11, 7.12, or 7.13. No points are available for meeting this mandatory requirement. If a project complies with a criterion 7.11, 7.12 and 7.13 in addition to meeting the mandatory requirement, it will earn eight points for each additional criterion. 

I.e. A project that complies with Criterion 7.11 earns zero points and meets the mandatory requirement for Promoting Health Through Design. A project that complies with Criterion 7.11 AND 7.12 meets the mandatory requirement for Promoting Health Through Design and earns eight points. And a project that complies with 7.11, 7.12 AND 7.13 meets the mandatory requirement for Promoting Health Through Design and earn sixteen points. 

Addendum
Date Posted:
April 25, 2022

Option 3: 

Advisory: This Option is not recommended for properties located below the “Warm-Humid” line of the 2018 IECC Figure 301.1. 

Requirements of Option 3 

Ensure all dwelling units are served by an ERV or HRV and provide a written statement/evidence that the project’s MEP Engineer(s) has evaluated humidity potential in the building. The statement must attest that the building and systems have been designed to ensure that year-round interior relative humidity will not exceed 50% in the winter and 60% in the summer.  

The project must provide the following: 

  • Condensation evaluation for window-to-wall connections and at any non-thermally broken metal penetrations through the exterior envelope to ensure no condensation will occur at the project’s outdoor design conditions with indoor winter conditions held at 68F and 50% RH.  Note that projects pursuing Passive House certification may submit their Passive House thermal bridge modeling report to comply with this item. 

  • Narrative summarizing ERV / HRV control strategies that are being utilized to manage year-round interior relative humidity levels:  

  • Measures that must be included to help manage cooling season interior humidity levels are:  

  • Appropriately sized cooling systems to ensure dehumidification capacity is maximized given the expected loads in the apartments 

  • Use of an ERV with moisture recovery to help keep exterior humidity from entering the space. 

  • An optional measure that can be implemented to help manage interior levels is use of a “dry mode” on the dwelling unit’s cooling system to improve dehumidification capacity during high interior RH humidity periods. 

  • Measures that must be included to help manage heating season interior humidity levels are:  

  • If unitized ERV is being used, the ERV system must have capability to boost flow rates during high interior humidity periods. 

  • If centralized ERV is being used, the ERV must have capability to partially bypass the energy recovery core or slow down the enthalpy wheel during periods of high interior humidity. Drawing(s) showing relative humidity monitors in return air ducts at the ERV / HRV to monitor apartment relative humidity.  

Note that the system used to comply with this option will likely also serve to comply with Criterion 7.7 Ventilation. 

FAQ
Date Posted:
September 11, 2020

 Q: Can projects follow more than one of the available Methods to comply with this criterion and accommodate different utility configurations? 

A: Yes, project teams may choose more than one of the Methods available in the criterion; A, B, C or D, to enable project building configuration and utility provider(s) to share energy and water data per the criteria.